6 Little India Street Food You Must Try

One of the best things about Singapore is its cultural diversity and the food that comes along with it. The mix of Malay, Chinese, and Indian with a dash of western influence has resulted in an interesting twist on the different cuisines, which have now become distinctively and singularly Singaporean.

In Little India, you can explore the varied dishes of the India subcontinent without actually having to go to South Asian. Within this ethnic enclave, you can sample both Muslim and Hindu specialties even as you learn more about the local Indian community’s history and culture.

If you’re a foodie, you’ll definitely enjoy the vast array of food choices that originated from the Northern and Southern regions of India. What’s more, you won’t even be limited to Indian cuisine as hawker stalls here offer international fare as well.

Everything in Little India is also within walking distance. As such, it’s a good idea to find an accommodation with a Little India Singapore address. You can simply roll out of bed and walk to the nearest hawker stall for breakfast. That said, it’s also wise to know the best street or hawker food to try while you’re in the neighborhood.

Dosai-Thosai from Anna Dosai Stall at Tekka Hawker Centre

Dosai or Thosai is Southern India’s version of the Chapati or Roti in Nothern India. It’s a crepe made with fermented rice and lentil, served with a variety of condiments. This is a purely vegetarian meal that’s also easy on the budget.

Fish Head Curry from Banana Leaf Apolo Restaurant

The Fish Head Curry is one of those uniquely Singaporean dishes that result from an amalgamation of different culinary traditions. The curry and spices are Southern Indian in origin while the use of the fish head is Chinese practice. It’s the signature dish in Banana Leaf Apolo and was even featured in the Singapore episode of Anthony Bourdain’s No Reservation.

Dum Biryani from Allaudin’s Biryani at the Tekka Hawker Centre

Allaudin’s offers you a choice of chicken or mutton biryani, but you can’t go wrong either way. This famous hawker stall serves both with a side of spicy curry sauce. With a most generous serving of rice and vegetables, it’s certainly a great meal to end the day with.

Roti Prata from the Roti Prata House

Made from stretchy dough with ghee, the roti prata is a popular staple from the Punjabi region of India. This flat bread is best eaten hot with some burnt crispy edges. The Roti Prata House serves a variety of Roti Pratas with flavors like Durian, Milo, and Ice Cream. But for a more authentic Indian taste, it’s better choose the coin prata set that’s served with traditional curry.

Samosas from Moghul Sweet Shop

An Indian snack is not complete without a serving of samosa. These baked treats come with a flaky crust that envelopes spiced vegetable such as potatoes, onions, and peas. While there are purely vegetarian samosas, there are variants with hearty ground meat as well. The Moghul Sweet Shop is touted to serve one of the best samosas in Singapore, so if you’re craving these Indian snacks, it’s worth a visit.

Naan With Chicken Tikka from Al-Madina Food Corner at Tekka Centre

Armed with an authentic tandoor oven, this hawker stall dishes out garlic naan bread like nobody’s business. In fact, they only cook the dough after you order to ensure a freshly baked naan all the time. Meanwhile, their chicken tikka is cooked with top-quality tandoor spices such that it is said to rival high-end Indian restaurants.

Appam from Deen’s Food Stall at Tekka Centre

Appam is known throughout India by many names, but it’s basically a rice pancake. Made from fermented rice batter and coconut milk, this pancake is not just a breakfast fare but a snack that you can enjoy any time of the day. In Little India, Deen’s Food Stall is the self-declared “Appam Specialist,” serving appam with a side of grated coconut and orange coconut sugar.

Little India is definitely the place to go for Indian food lovers. You can have fun learning about Indian culture in Singapore through their traditional and fusion cuisines. Best of all, you don’t have to spend a lot money with all the hawker stands and small shops to choose from.

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